Euromillions

Statistiques d'euromillions | stats d'euro lottery | euro-millions.com

Examples of Lottery Scams

As more and more people are becoming wise to lottery scams, fraudsters are getting increasingly creative. Here are just some examples of lottery scams you may receive:

Second Chance Lottery/Raffle

Usually based around a rollover draw, the scammer will claim you have won a prize in a ‘second chance’ EuroMillions draw. EuroMillions does not hold such ‘second chance’ draws. Unclaimed prizes are always either returned to the prize pool to pay winners in future draws or transferred to the good causes supported by the lottery.

Lottery Winner Trusts

Some scammers are using the names of known charitable lottery winners to try and extract personal information from the intended victim by claiming that the legitimate jackpot winner is looking to donate funds to people who are less fortunate or in need.

Anti Terrorism Agency

The victim receives a letter telling them there is a cheque waiting to be sent to them as soon as they pay a fee to an agency that ensures international money transfers over a certain value do not contain funds associated with terrorism.

To see an example of a scam letter received, visit the Example EuroMillions Scam page.

How to Identify a EuroMillions Lottery Scam

  • It is not possible to win a EuroMillions prize, raffle, sweepstake or competition that you have not entered. If you receive a notification informing you that you have won a prize in a game you have never played, it is a scam.
  • To win a EuroMillions prize, you must have purchased a ticket for the correct draw date and your number selection must match the balls required to win the relevant prize.
  • You do not win EuroMillions prizes based on randomly selected mobile phone numbers or email addresses, including for games which you did not enter.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay any type of ‘fee’ to receive your prize.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay the ‘tax’ due on the win in advance of receiving a prize.

Clues to Identify a Scam

All of the points listed below are usually a good indication that the winning notification you have received is a scam:

  • The email has been sent from a free webmail address (for example @hotmail.com, @outlook.com or @yahoo.com) or from an unrelated address that could have been compromised.
  • The letter or email does not address you personally but instead starts with something vague like ‘Dear Winner’. This may not always be the case, however, so don’t assume the message is genuine just because it uses your name.
  • Scam letters are often on poor quality, photocopied letterhead (although some will include a genuine business address in an attempt to provide legitimacy). It is worth noting that not all scam letters are of a low quality; scammers are constantly updating and improving technology so their messages may appear more legitimate.
  • There is often a strict time limit to claim the ‘prize’. This is intended to put the potential victim under pressure and deter them from seeking advice or investigating the matter further.
  • Confidentiality is often demanded as a ‘condition of winning’. Again, this is to deter the recipient from seeking the advice of friends or family who may be more familiar with this type of scam.
  • The communication may contain complicated language and jargon, such as ticket numbers and ‘batch’ references in an attempt to give the document an ‘official’ feel.
  • Poor spelling, grammar and syntax are usually a good indication that the letter or email is a scam.
  • A photocopy of a cheque with your name on it may be contained within the communication to entice you into sending funds, something which real lotteries would never do.
  • Some scams may claim to be from Euro-Millions.com, but please remember that we will never contact you under any circumstances to say you have won a prize. Any prize notifications that supposedly originate from Euro-Millions.com are fraudulent.
Оцените статью